1934

BEDAUX EXPEDITION

 

The first Citroëns in BC were undoubtably from the The Bedaux Expedition of 1934, also named The Bedaux Canadian Subarctic Expedition. This was an attempt by eccentric French millionaire, Charles Eugène Bedaux, to cross the wilderness of the northern parts of Alberta and northern British Columbia in Canada, while making a film, testing Citroën half-track vehicles, and generating publicity for himself. Bedaux was acquainted with car manufacturer, Andre Citroën, who designed the Citroën- Kégresse equipped half-track trucks that were used on the expedition. Of the five Citroëns that the party used, two were reported to have slid off of cliffs and a third was used in a shot where it was put on a raft where it was supposed to meet a stick of dynamite and explode. However, the shot was ruined when the dynamite failed to explode and the truck floated down river and was stuck in a sandbar. The last two Citroëns were abandoned near Halfway River.

 

When the Alaska Highway was built in the 1940's, a Fort St. John man discovered the remains of these last two half-tracks and one was donated to the Western Development Museum in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan and the second is located at the Reynolds-Alberta Museum.

 

We found nothing on Traction Avants being sold in BC, but Club President Rupert Downing did drive a rare left hand drive Slough-built ’48 Traction Avant Légère that may have been built for Canada.

CITROËN-KÉGRESSE HALF-TRACK TRUCKS FROM THE 1934 BEDAUX EXPEDITION

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SURVIVING CITROËN-KÉGRESSE IN THE WESTERN DEVELOPMENT MUSEUM IN SASKATCHEWAN

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SURVIVING CITROËN-KÉGRESSE IS IN THE REYNOLDS-ALBERTA MUSEUM

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